Online Programming Challenges: How to Assess and What to Do? 

Many employers are seeking skilled programmers who can help their business succeed and for their brand to be widely recognized. That said, competition in the job market can be tough for programmers. If you want to get hired, you need to be able to prove to a prospective employer that you are the best candidate for a position in their company. There are many ways to do this, such as becoming certified for a particular programming method or software, or by proving your abilities and skills through online programming challenges.

Discerning employers are already looking into programming challenges online to identify the best candidates to hire. There, you can do a programming skills test, which can improve your programming prowess. If you are new to programming, you are still welcome to take the online skills test to assess how much you know and which areas you should improve on. One of the leading coding challenges online is a fun and educational test that will teach you the concepts of modern programming languages in a simple environment that can make you feel like you are merely playing a game.

With online programming challenges, you can start from the basics and continue to advance to more challenging skills tests, while learning as you continue to play. Rest assured, the programming skills test will teach the techniques that can be applied to other programming languages. Some of the things you can learn are program structure, object and methods, parameterization, decomposition, loops, conditionals, debugging, optimization, and recursion. All these are delivered through a simplified platform, which you can learn to use in a few minutes.

Do not forget to challenge yourself with coding challenges online, even if you think that you are already an expert or at an advanced level. Whether you are a top software specialist or a novice in software programming, you will find the programming challenges to be helpful in assessing your strengths and weaknesses in what you do, so you can continue succeeding in your career.

Friday, November 1, 2019 7:04:00 AM Categories: computer programming tips and tricks

Know the Importance and Use of Employee Assessment Tools 

Companies are becoming more diligent in the recruitment process to ensure they are hiring the best talents. One of the additional steps that they are taking is using employee assessment tools. How are these tools changing the way recruiters do candidate or employee assessment? What are the benefits they offer? Find out all the answer as you read further.

 

Streamlines the screening process

Employee assessment is mostly done during the pre-hiring period. Today, companies use online tools to easily administer tests to candidates. Such tools are advantageous because they allow the candidate to take assessments conveniently anywhere. In the same way, recruiters also benefit from using the online tools since they get the results of assessment fast. Plus, this also removes the burden of administration from them. Online employee assessment tools save time as well as money.

 

Test the candidate's competencies

Without employee assessment tools that measure skills and knowledge, it will be difficult to assess a candidate's competencies. Recruiters will find it hard to verify if the candidate really has the technical know-how and other abilities they are looking for if they will only look at the resume and conduct interviews. Pre-employment assessment tests help them verify the candidate's claim, avoid making a bad hire, and ultimately hire the perfect fit.

 

Get accurate of employee assessment results

Online employee assessment tools are not only convenient—they are also accurate. They feature automated systems that automatically checks and grades performance on tests. They ensure that the test scores are correctly checked according to the specified standards. The results are more reliable and are free of human error.

 

Evaluate candidates with no bias

One of the top reasons why every company should have reliable and well-designed skill assessment tools is to evaluate each candidate fairly. Employers won't be basing their decisions on their resumes or looks but on the evidence-based information.

Saturday, October 5, 2019 7:02:00 AM Categories: computer programming

Choose Versatile Online Programming Challenges to Hone Your Programming Skills 

If you want to take your career in programming seriously, it is crucial to look for ways to enhance your knowledge and improve your skills to make sure that you don’t miss out on the latest trends in the fast changing and ever-evolving field of coding. As the modern world becomes more technologically linked, the demand for technical skills is higher than ever. The dynamic nature of the programming field also means that your success as a programming specialist largely depends upon your ability to adapt and learn. Finding ways to continuously improve your skills is crucial, hence the prominence of online programming challenges that many coders, beginners and veterans alike, use in order to improve their skills base.

When looking for the right online programming challenges to use, it is important to know what your learning style is like so you can get the most out of the program. People learn differently. While some may learn best by reading books, others prefer hands-on experiences. Others still need a structured program, which formal courses provide. The great news for those who want to learn programming and enhance their skills is that there are plenty of low-cost and sometimes even free learning resources that are readily available online, so you are only a few clicks away from a good learning program.

When in the middle of particularly difficult online programming challenges, walking away from the problem for at least a few minutes or getting a fresh set of eyes to look at the portion you are stuck at is a good way to overcome the task and create the right solution. Other online programming challenges allow you to look under the hood of programs and apps so you can familiarize yourself with common coding patterns and learn how to navigate extensive code bases, understand code, and identify design patterns effectively.

Thursday, September 5, 2019 6:51:00 AM Categories: computer programming

Summer 2019 Winners 

We had some amazing entries for the Summer 2019 contest. When the dust settled, here were our three winners. Congratulations!

Rank User Name Country Score
1 name_not_important  United Kingdom  7185
2 DeFrog Hungary 6732
3 soufianeh Morocco 5952

 

Winners: We will be in touch with you via e-mail to arrange for prize delivery.

Thanks to all that participated! Stay tuned for more contests in the future.

 

Posted by Brian Conte Friday, August 30, 2019 6:32:00 PM Categories: computer programming game contests

5 Tips for Learning to Excel in Coding Challenges 

The job market for software development is as competitive as it is rewarding. However, there are many barriers to entry for those who want to break into software development. Besides going through training and certifications for required technical skills, coding challenges during technical interviews also make entry into the software development job market difficult for many hopefuls.

Coding challenges are a crucial part of software development recruitment, especially for positions that require code writing. When applying for vacancies that require software writing, it is only natural for interviewers to make you write software, hence the widespread use of online coding challenges, which help recruiters narrow down their pool of candidates to absolutely qualified and skilled talents. When you are up for a programming assessment test, here are tips to help you excel:

1.   Read the instructions carefully. A typical coding challenge comes with written instructions. Take your time to read through what is being asked of you to make sure that you understand what the challenge entails. It would be a shame and a huge waste of an opportunity to write a flawless code that solves the wrong challenge or misses out on a key requirement only because you failed to read the instructions through.

2.   Plan out your actions. Sketch a plan before jumping in with both feet to tackle a coding challenge. The best way to fail at online coding challenges is to make stuff up as you go. If you plan out your coding strategy, it will be easier to create a code that works and not one that will back you into a corner or a dead end.

3.   Make a list of technical decisions you will likely have to make. This will help you look at the development from a wider, big-picture perspective, hence enabling you to make critical coding decisions faster.

4.   Opt for test-driven development. Your unit testing skills can very well make or break your chances at progressing into higher levels of the recruiting process. While failure to write test may not necessarily disqualify you from the running toward a particular position, including testing in your coding strategy is going to be a huge advantage as reviewers favor a holistic approach to coding.

5.   Make your code readable. Remember that your solution is going to be read and assessed by a software developer. It is for this reason that you should make your code legible and easy to follow

Most coding challenges include stages including parsing and processing input and presenting output—critical code writing stages that you should prepare for if you want to ace a coding challenge.

Thursday, August 1, 2019 12:37:00 AM Categories: computer programming computer science

How to Deal with Online Programming Challenges? 

As an aspiring programmer or software developer, you must prepare yourself to face the most challenging coding situations. A prospective employer or client might subject you to programming challenges to test your skills, understanding, knowledge, and abilities and find out if you are what they need for their business or their project. Practice makes perfect, so if you want to improve your skills, consider finding online coding challenges. These are like tests or games that can sharpen your skills, improve your flexibility in coding, and enhance your problem-solving ability, while making sure that you can maintain the best programming practices and write the best code, which your employer or client will be pleased with.

Online coding challenges may be helpful, but if you are not careful, they could be overwhelming. To avoid confusion, consider taking your time to read the instructions carefully, and repeat as necessary until you can fully understand them. That way, you can write the right code and avoid making mistakes or missing out on certain features just because you breezed through the instructions. It is advisable to read the instructions carefully even if you think you have encountered the same programming challenges elsewhere, as there could be some small but critical differences. But do not let the instructions overwhelm you. If it helps, write the things you must do so you can have your own roadmap as you proceed.

Making a plan is another way to handle online coding challenges. Take some time to sketch the major aspects of the program to see how they go together. This may also help you identify issues on the spot, or avoid encountering problems down the line. Take note that your program may be different from your outline, but when you have a clear idea on what to do, you could save time and increase your chance at getting at a better solution.

Tuesday, March 26, 2019 5:58:00 AM Categories: computer programming

Herbert's Summer 2018 Contest Happens This Weekend! 

Ready to prove your programming prowess? Herbert's Summer 2018 Contest is happening this weekend!

This year we are using a different format. Instead of having 30 days to complete the test, you'll have just 30 minutes to solve as many levels as you can. There are 10 levels in the contest, ranging from easy to difficult. How far can you get?

First place prize this year is a $100 Amazon gift certificate.

The contest starts exactly at September 2 0:00 GMT - that's Saturday afternoon (September 1) for North America.

Click here to enter, or to sign up for an SMS reminder one hour before the contest. Participation is free.

New to Herbert? I suggest clicking the contest link one hour beforehand, to give yourselves time to register, take the tutorial, and practice on some older contests before the new contest starts.

Good luck!

Brian

View User Profile for Brian Conte
Posted by Brian Conte Thursday, August 30, 2018 5:25:00 PM Categories: computer programming game contests

Herbert's Summer 2017 Contest - Final Results! 

Herbert's Summer 2017 Contest ended yesterday and the final leaderboard is available here. Congratulations to misaki from Japan for winning this contest. As you can see, it was a close match between misaki and several others, including AlexDinaro of Russia, wwvww of Japan, and Blakman of Russia, and at least one other top competitor that did not choose to show themselves on the leaderboard. The leadership position changed many times during the course of the competition.

Don't see your name on the leaderboard? It may be because you did not check "I would like my name, school or organization, country, and score to be included in contest leaderboards." in your profile. Go to your profile page to change that.

This contest proved to be a tough one. 126 people joined the contest, but levels 20, 24, and 25 remain unsolved by anyone.

The most time was spent on level 16 - this proved surprisingly hard, with only 5 people solving it by the end of the contest.

(Max 20 bytes).

Thanks for participating! I hope you enjoyed the contest, and the new web client. I'd love to get your feedback on both. You can email me or post to our facebook page.

Stay tuned for more contests!

Brian

Posted by Brian Conte Saturday, September 2, 2017 8:33:00 PM Categories: computer programming game contests

Herbert's Summer 2017 Contest is Open! 

Good news! We just opened our summer contest for 2017, with 25 new Herbert levels to challenge you, ranging from easy to mind-blowing. The contest will be open through the end of July. How well can you do?

You can access the contest here, using the old Herbert app.

Or give our alpha web/mobile app a try! Just head over to http://herbert.wildnoodle.com, sign in, and choose Summer 2017 Contest.

Some notes on the alpha:

  1. This is a web app that you should be able to access from any device and most current browsers. We recommend Chrome for the best experience. Please note the app has known issues with Internet Explorer.
  2. If you have previously registered to Wild Noodle but have forgotten your password, use "forgot password" to reset it.
  3. You may use your social media account to log in, but it must be associated with the email that you previously registered with; otherwise, you will not be able to access any prior work.
  4. Once you log in, if you use the email you previously registered with, you should be able to access your prior contest work using "Switch Contest" on the popup menu (second icon from right). 
  5. New to Herbert? Choose "Tutorial" on the popup menu for a quick tutorial on programming in Herbert.
  6. Remember this an alpha - it should work for the most part, but you may encounter some issues. Please let us know if you do!

Have fun! Happy Herberting!

Posted by Brian Conte Monday, July 3, 2017 9:49:00 PM Categories: computer programming computer science game contests

I am a Woman in Computer Science But I Keep Forgetting That 

How do I feel as a woman entering the field of Computer Science? I feel excited? I love to code. Yet there’s also a little twinge of nervousness- how will I be received in a mostly male-dominated field? Will I notice that I am different? Will others notice it? Does it matter? I have a lot of questions, and I am sure they will all be answered as my life plays out. I am very optimistic that by the time I am fully immersed in the industry, there will be many more women. 

The question, “will I notice if I am different” is one I am particularly intrigued by. The thing is, I am not yet fully sure how I feel about being a woman in Computer Science. It is one of those things I don’t think much of until someone asks me. In my courses, my head is usually buried in my notes, or intently listening to the professor. I never really look around me to see how many girls or boys are in my engineering classes. When I score well on Matrix Algebra, Physics, or CSE exams, I don’t find out whether more boys than girls did well. It is something that I know is present, yet I am so used to it, I do not recognize it. 

When I lift my head and look around and actually am required to engage in a group setting, then I am suddenly aware that I think differently, and what I say is not necessarily taken seriously. When I first applied to the Computer Science major, they asked me to speak to the unique perspective I would offer to the program. My mom suggested I write about being a woman, but I told myself that was too much of a cliché.  That my essay wouldn’t have stood out had I gone that route. 

Thinking back on it, I do not know why I chose not to speak out about my being a woman, one things that give me a unique perspective, in a field that offers only 18% of its bachelor degrees to women. Being a girl and wanting to major in computer science was my unique perspective.  Yet, I undersold myself because I was convinced that being a woman and writing about it might be seen as complaining in the eyes of the admission’s committee. I told myself they can’t admit you based off of your gender. I told myself being a woman wasn’t really something special. I told myself I would be complaining about something that wasn't really all that bad. While my thought process was based in sound reasoning, as there have been countless pushes to encourage more young women to join STEM fields, there are still numerous amounts of backlash. For every push to increase numbers of women in Computer Science, there is another article trying to push women out of this field, one boy in your CSE class telling you you’re misusing a Linked List (you’re not), and one movie where the main computer-code-cracking character is a boy. The fact that I felt uncompelled to write about my being a woman as a unique perspective in the computer science field is just the beginning to why it gives me such a unique perspective.

Growing up I always loved math, and I never saw my gender as a reason not to. Yet, in the sixth grade I begged my parents to let me switch out of advanced math classes, because I thought loving math would make me unpopular. To my benefit, they refused to buy into this idea I had created in my head, and I stayed in my advanced math class - and I was much happier there. It’s no secret that past generations have been afraid of being “nerdy”- all you have to do is watch an 80’s movie or a Disney show and I guarantee the unpopular kid is good at school. The thing is, we are lucky we live in a day and age where it is becoming cool to be smart. We lift up the super cool tech savvy heroes who have created the social media and technological devices we love. The super smart kids who get into Ivy Leagues are envied, and getting a 5 on your AP Physics test is just as cool as scoring a touchdown or being a cheerleader. This changing demographic is clear, and all you have to do is watch 21 Jump Street to see it pan out in the media. So in this new and accepting, liberating world, why did I think acting dumber than I was would make me cool? Trying to figure the answer out, I started asking some of my friends at school questions.

I asked engineering and non-engineering students some questions. Both groups said that being smart was seen as cool at their high schools. Yet, when I asked questions related to their feelings on STEM courses, most males picked majors based on if they did or did not like STEM. Most women, however, who chose a non-engineering major picked it because they thought they were bad at math or science. I found these responses to be interesting, so I did some research and discovered hundreds of studies on the trend of girls’ declining skills in math.  The studies show that girls excel in math past boys in elementary school, yet fall behind once high school rolls around. These studies also note that girls and boys have the ability to perform equally in math, but girls believe they aren’t as good at it.  Math is an algorithmic process, and being good at it leads to interest in STEM, which therefore leads to choosing computer science. These studies are pretty sad when you think of what they must be doing to women’s interest in computer science. Thinking you aren’t good at something means you probably won’t choose that for a major and a career.

Thinking I’m not good at something all the time is another key to my unique perspective. I have noticed I do not have the same confidence in my work as my fellow male peers, but that doesn’t have to be a bad thing. I have learned I am more open to criticism, more flexible when it comes to problem solving, and more open to different routes to solving the problem. I have grown up with the idea that my thinking might not be right, so I actively seek out corrections and things to fix. This is a trait that is beneficial in the field of coding, because your first try at something probably won’t be your last. 

For the most part, being a woman entering the field of Computer Science is exciting. Although I have spent a majority of this post speaking to the obstacles I still see present, many people are working towards breaking down these barriers. It feels as though there are many people on my team, and many people want woman to succeed and become a part of this field. I feel motivated to do a good job at work, not just for my own benefit, but for this large support network I feel I have as a woman in STEM. Being a woman is not enough to get you a job, or to get you in a major, but it is something that represents a unique view you may have to offer. You still have to be exceptional at what you do, to be a team player, and embody a positive attitude. 

For every challenge that exists as a women entering the field of Computer Science, there is a definite reward. I am a girl who loves Britney Spears, glitter, the color pink and coding, and I am sure there are hundreds of girls just like me who would fall in love with CS if they gave themselves a chance. It is important for me to remember that I am special as a woman. What I bring to this field will, I believe, help me see things differently than my male counterparts, which in turn, will help us together as a team create some pretty cool code.

Posted by Miri Hyman Monday, August 8, 2016 8:02:00 PM Categories: computer programming computer science
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